Talking to
Your Doctor

We get it. You may not want to talk about gout. But it’s important to talk openly with your doctor to make sure you’re covering all aspects of your condition. Knowing what questions to ask can help you have a productive conversation about your gout experience and treatment options.

Tell Your Doctor

  • How you're feeling: How often you have experienced gout symptoms in the last 12 months
    • Symptoms may include swelling, tenderness around the affected joints that may feel warm to the touch, tingling and/or tingles, twinges (sudden, sharp pain), and severe pain
  • What you’re putting in your body: What medications you take to manage your gout symptoms and flares (e.g., OTC pain medications, colchicine, corticosteroids, etc.), and what you take to decrease your uric acid levels
  • What else you’ve got going on: About all of your medical conditions and about all of the medicines you take

Ask Your Doctor

  • How am I doing? What were the results of my last uric acid level tests?
  • Is my uric acid level low enough? Did I reach the American College of Rheumatology recommended uric acid level of <6 mg∕dL?

Do you have a doctor’s appointment coming up?

This conversation starter is easy to use.
So print it out and bring it with you to your
next doctor’s appointment.


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Important Safety Information

DUZALLO can cause serious side effects, including:

Kidney Problems: Some people taking DUZALLO may have kidney problems, such as a sudden decrease in kidney function (acute kidney failure). Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check your kidneys while you are taking DUZALLO.

Serious Skin Rash and Serious Allergic Reactions: Severe and potentially life-threatening allergic reactions and skin reactions, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and exfoliative dermatitis, have been reported in some people taking allopurinol, one of the components of DUZALLO. Stop taking DUZALLO and get emergency medical help if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • skin rash; blistering of the skin, mouth, nose, and genitals
  • painful red or purple skin that looks burned and peels off
  • joint pain; swollen glands
  • red, painful, watery eyes; persistent itching; hives
  • fever

Do not take DUZALLO if you have severe kidney problems, have received a kidney transplant or are on dialysis, have a fast breakdown of cancer cells that can lead to high uric acid (tumor lysis syndrome), have a rare inherited condition that causes too much uric acid in the blood (Lesch-Nyhan syndrome), or had a skin rash or other allergic reaction after taking allopurinol.

Liver Problems: Liver problems can happen in people who take DUZALLO. Call your healthcare provider if you have any of the following symptoms: loss of appetite, weight loss, feeling very tired, nausea or vomiting, yellowing of your skin or the white part of your eyes, itching, dark or brown (tea-colored) urine, or pain on the upper right side of your stomach.

Heart Problems: People who take DUZALLO can have serious heart problems, including heart attack and stroke. It is not known that DUZALLO causes these problems.

Blood Problems: DUZALLO can affect your bone marrow and cause low red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. If your blood cell counts become very low, you can get infections or have bleeding problems. Taking DUZALLO with certain other medicines can increase your chance of having blood problems.

Drowsiness: DUZALLO can cause you to be drowsy. Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do other dangerous activities until you know how DUZALLO affects you.

The most common side effects of DUZALLO include headache, flu, higher levels of blood creatinine (a measure of kidney function), heartburn (acid reflux), skin rash, nausea, and diarrhea. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all of the possible side effects of DUZALLO. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

What is DUZALLO?

DUZALLO is a prescription medicine that contains 2 medicines, a URAT1 inhibitor called lesinurad and a xanthine oxidase inhibitor called allopurinol. DUZALLO is used to lower uric acid levels in the blood in people with gout, when allopurinol alone has not worked well enough.

Please see Medication Guide and full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning.

Ironwood Contact Center for general inquiries: 1-844-374-4793.

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Important Safety Information

DUZALLO can cause serious side effects, including:

Kidney Problems: Some people taking DUZALLO may have kidney problems, such as a sudden decrease in kidney function (acute kidney failure). Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check your kidneys while you are taking DUZALLO.